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Art & Art History

Adventures in Studio Painting

Jerome Grimmer
Professional artist
Hours Four and Five, 2:15–4:10 p.m., Two-week course
(art supply fee associated with this class) 

Seeing with new inspiration is the real thrill of this class. When unseen limitless beauty that has been before our blind eyes all along is suddenly unveiled, capturing its essence and inspiration on canvas becomes surprisingly easy. Through demonstrations, exercises, and individual instruction, new students quickly master necessary painting skills and techniques, while advanced students work on more ambitious subjects with help and guidance from the instructor as needed and requested. Finished paintings ready for framing and display are the inspiring result.

Drawing and Sketching

Leah McFall, MSEd, MFA
Theatre professor and set designer
Hour Three, 11:15 a.m.–12:05 p.m., Two-week course
(art supply fee associated with this class)

Keeping a sketching journal is a wonderful way to enrich your travels or just take a more reflective approach to daily living. We will work on such drawing skills as perspective, observation, shading, texture, and proportion, while learning from the sketching journals of some of history’s great artists. We will also enjoy the view from Principia’s beautifully renovated Voney Art Center on the bluffs, as well as its state-of-the-art classrooms and shared spaces. Expect to leave with new ideas, enhanced skills, and a sketchbook full of great memories!

Matisse and Picasso

Susie Ledbetter, MEd
Hour One, 9:05–9:55 a.m., One-week course
Week Two only

Matisse Picasso, a 2003 landmark exhibition at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, was dedicated to the lifelong dialogue between two of the most important artists of the 20th century. Struck by each other’s genius ever since they met in 1906, each recognized the other to be his only true rival and measure of success. Matisse Picasso tells the compelling story of two artists who were driven to ever higher levels of accomplishment by looking at and learning from one another for nearly half a century. Despite their personal differences, these men were closer in spirit than any other artists of that time. We’ll learn how Matisse Picasso not only confirms the artists’ status as giants of their time but also offers previously unexplored insights into the complex personal and artistic relationship that defined the standards for painting in the 20th century.

Watercolor Workshop

Leah McFall, MSEd, MFA
Theatre professor and set designer
Hours One and Two, 9:05–11:00 a.m., Two-week course
(art supply fee associated with this class) 

Would you love to spend two hours every day in a beautiful, light-filled space overlooking the bluffs of the Mississippi, learning and practicing watercolor techniques with a fun, supportive community of learners? If so, join us in Watercolor Workshop. Students will range from beginners to experienced. All are welcome! Through daily teacher-demos, practice, and sharing of feedback and ideas, everyone will move forward. Bring pieces you are working on, or get inspired on location. This class is tailored to meet the goals and learning needs of each student.


Bible & Religion

“Acquaintance with the Original Texts”: Insights from Greek and Hebrew

Jim Moser
Upper School teacher
Hour One, 9:05–9:55 a.m., One-week course
Week Two only

In this course, you'll learn basic biblical Greek and Hebrew and discover how much even a slight "acquaintance with the original texts" (Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, p. 24) can unlock very profound spiritual ideas in many of our most beloved and familiar Bible passages.

Biblical Symbols

Evan MacDonald
Bible studies teacher
Hour One, 9:05–9:55 a.m., One-week course
Week One only

Speaking of John's depiction of the Holy City, New Jerusalem, Mary Baker Eddy says, "Spiritual teaching must always be by symbols" (Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, p. 575). This class will look at symbols of the seven days of creation as a way of understanding the Bible more clearly. Heaven, earth, trees, fowl, and so on present us with new ways of looking at familiar Bible stories. More importantly, they give us a deeper understanding of God.

Every Day, Caring

Journal-listed Christian Science nurses
Hours Five and Six, 3:20–5:15 p.m., One-week course
Offered both weeks

What does Christ Jesus’ command to love one another look like? This course highlights Jesus’ parable of the good Samaritan and explores ideas in the context of the Church Manual By-Law “Christian Science Nurse” (p. 49), which is relevant not only to members of The Mother Church but to all mankind. With our Pastor as foundation and springboard, we’ll have fun exploring ideas and engaging in activities that enable us to discover how “nursing” (cherishing, nurturing) ourselves and others from a Christly standpoint fulfills our “duty to God, to [our] Leader, and to mankind” (Church Manual, p. 42). We will also see how this nursing fosters and contributes to a community of caring. And we will share insights about prayerfully approaching relationships, communication, and practical assistance for individuals. Bring your questions—together, we’ll find the answers! This course builds on the morning Bible classes.

Exploring the Book of Hebrews

Anne Cooling, CS
Hour Three, 11:15 a.m.–12:05 p.m., One-week course
Week Two only

Discover why Mary Baker Eddy refers to the book of Hebrews as a "remarkable epistle." Peter and Paul have been martyred, the temple has been destroyed, and the Jewish audience that converted to Christianity is exhausted and slipping away. Their spiritual leader is absent, and there is a need to strengthen their faith. The result is the book of Hebrews and its exploration of theology and faith.

Healing Theologies and Practices in the Early Christian Church

Shirley Paulson, PhD
Hour Four, 2:15–3:05 p.m., Two-week course

This class explores the meaning and practices of healing in the early Christian church based on newly discovered texts written around the time the New Testament texts were written and a little later. We’ll compare these findings with early Christian contemporaries and modern Christian Science concepts.

Exploring the Holy Ghost in Scripture

Anne Cooling, CS
Hour Five, 3:20–4:10 p.m., One-week course
Week Two only

We will explore the leavening activity of the Holy Ghost—which Mary Baker Eddy describes as the evidence of divine Science—from the Old Testament to the present day. We’ll learn to recognize its healing presence and power in moving thought and revealing the work of God in His creation, even in the midst of human difficulties.

Job, Psalms, and Proverbs

Barry Huff, PhD, ThM, MTS
Religion professor
Hour Four, 2:15–3:05 p.m., One-week course
Week One only

Join us to explore the Bible's literary masterpiece, hymnal, and wisdom. Wrestle with vital questions and theological breakthroughs in Job, the subject of Dr. Huff’s doctoral dissertation and master's thesis. Probe the spiritual significance of the genres, editing, and imagery of Psalms. Revel in the wisdom of Proverbs.

New Testament Highlights

Barry Huff, PhD, ThM, MTS
Religion professor
Hour Two, 10:10–11:00 a.m., One-week course
Week One only

Deepen your appreciation of the healing messages of New Testament texts. Discover the historical contexts and unique emphases of each of the canonical gospels. Understand Paul's letters, and converse with the apostle to the Gentiles as portrayed by Dr. Huff. Proclaim the reign of God in Jesus’ parables and Revelation.

Prayer in the New Testament

Heather Martin, PhD
Religion professor
Hour Two, 10:10–11:00 a.m., One-week course
Week Two only

Prayer lies at the heart of all religious experience. One cannot fully understand the New Testament without understanding the importance and function of prayer in the life and ministry of Jesus, in his teachings, and among his earliest followers. This course will begin by considering prayer in the Old Testament and Jewish life in the first century, move on to Jesus and the Gospels, and finally consider the book of Acts through the lens of biblical scholarship. We’ll also see that, as Mary Baker Eddy says, “The world must grow to the spiritual understanding of prayer” (Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, p. 10).

Revelation: Unpacking Its Heavenly Symbols

Madelon Maupin, MTS
Founder of Bible Roads
Hour Five, 3:20–4:10 p.m., One-week course
Week One only

As one of only two apocalyptic texts in our Bible, Revelation has been a “head-scratcher” for centuries. We'll explore its structure, authorship, historical setting, and especially some of its symbols taken from the Hebrew Scriptures. Revelation is the Bible's strongest statement on spiritual warfare—one we want to understand in our own spiritual journey.

Teaching the Bible and Spiritual Concepts to Young Children

Dorothy Halverson, MA
Principia’s Acorn Director
Hour One, 9:05–9:55 a.m., One-week course
Week One only

Have you ever wondered how to share spiritual concepts with young children and help them understand and apply some of the lessons taught through favorite Bible stories? In this course, we will look at a few of the first Bible lessons and stories often taught to young children, and we’ll explore age-appropriate techniques and hands-on activities that help children grasp their meaning. Materials will be provided for a make-and-take workshop. The lesson ideas are geared toward two- to six-year-olds. If you're a Sunday School teacher, parent, or grandparent who interacts with young children, you won't want to miss this course.

The Judges

Evan MacDonald
Bible studies teacher
Hour Three, 11:15 a.m.–12:05 p.m., One-week course
Week One only

The book of Judges showcases the era in the history of the Children of Israel after the great leadership of Moses and Joshua and prior to the kingdoms of Saul, David, and Solomon. This period is categorized by the ebb and flow of the Children of Israel doing "evil in the sight of the Lord," which led them into captivity. Through the guidance of a judge, they were led back to honoring God and being freed from oppression. Come and see how Deborah, Gideon, Samson, and Samuel provided leadership at a trying time for the Israelites.


History & Film

America through Baseball

Peter van Lidth de Jeude, PhD
History professor
Hour Five, 3:20–4:10 p.m., Two-week course

This course focuses on the way baseball highlights the promises, perils, and paradoxes of American history. Baseball tells the story of American democracy and progress. It also illuminates conflicts, specifically rural against urban, labor against capital, and civil rights against racial segregation. By studying baseball, we can learn much about America.

Casablanca at 75

Clark Beim-Esche, MA
Retired English/fine arts teacher
Hour Three, 11:15 a.m.–12:05 p.m., Two-week course

“Play it again, Sam,” “I’m shocked, shocked to find that gambling is going on in here,” “Round up the usual suspects,”
and many other actual or remembered moments from Michael Curtiz’s Academy Award-winning Best Picture of 1943 will be the focus of our discussions regarding this memorable and widely beloved film. Of special interest, in addition to the screenplay written by Julius and Phillip Epstein along with Howard Koch, will be a fuller appreciation of Arthur Edeson’s cinematography, Carl Jules Weyl’s art direction, Orry-Kelly’s costume design, and Max Steiner’s musical score. We will take time to appreciate all the various elements that have gone into making Casablanca—with its superb cast of leading and supporting characters—a classic of Hollywood storytelling.

Fred and Ginger

Howard Bay, MA
Retired social studies teacher
Hour Four, 2:15–3:05 p.m., Two-week course

As the most famous dance partners in motion picture history, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers revolutionized the Hollywood musical during the 1930s. Though they appeared together in just 10 films during their prolific careers, Astaire and Rogers set the standard for all dance teams to come. By examining scenes from their movies, this course offers an engaging look at the artistry and chemistry that has captivated audiences for over 80 years. We’ll also consider fascinating biographical information about both performers, especially Ginger Rogers, who was a lifelong Christian Scientist.

Inspiration Points: Places Where Our Poets Wrote

Clark Beim-Esche, MA
Retired English/fine arts teacher
Hour One, 9:05–9:55 a.m., Two-week course

For the past year and a half, Clark and his wife, Carol, have visited the homes and locations that inspired a variety of American authors. The working title of their book in process is Inspiration Points: Places Where Our Writers Wrote, and its purpose is to put readers in touch with some of the greatest American literary giants. The class will feature four of America’s greatest poets—Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, and Edna St. Vincent Millay. Whether you are a poetry lover or have always found poetry difficult to understand, this is the course for you. Travel to places where these writers lived, and see what influenced their writing. Wonderful discussions and unforgettable discoveries await us!

Made You Laugh: Part Deux

Howard Bay, MA
Retired social studies teacher
Hour Two, 10:10–11:00 a.m., Two-week course

It’s been 50 years since Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In defied the rules of traditional sketch comedy, paving the way for the satirical skills of Monty Python and ultimately the still-popular Saturday Night Live. In a similar vein, filmmakers such as Mel Brooks literally blazed a path for others to follow in making movies that made fun of other movies. Parodies such as Young Frankenstein and Airplane!—classics of the genre—have inspired a new generation of moviegoers to memorize lines from their favorite spoofs. This course will pick up where last year’s class left off, in 1968, to take another look at what makes people laugh—this time during the decades many have called comedy’s “tongue-in-cheek” years.

Plato’s Republic: Looking for Justice

Chris Young, MA
Philosophy professor
Hour Three 11:15 a.m.–12:05 p.m., One-week course
Week Two only

At the start of Plato's longest and most famous dialogue, the character Socrates is confronted with a challenging question—Does might make right? His attempt to say no provides an interesting introduction to the story of Western philosophy. We’ll explore this question, which continues to be relevant today.

Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, and Their Fight to Save the Traditional Lakota Way of Life

John Lyon
Media Services Center Director
Hour Two, 10:10–11:00 a.m., Two-week course

Lakota Chiefs Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse played key roles in the Battle of the Little Bighorn, commonly referred to as Custer's Last Stand. The story is one of strength, courage, family, duty, and self-sacrifice. It is a story about America's indigenous people and their desire to continue to live a free life in the face of Euro-American encroachment. Though part of our American history, it is broader than that—a story about how we as human beings see and treat our fellow man.

The Not-So-Great Great War: World War I

Ed Harper, PhD
Lecturer, University of Miami Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
Lucy Harper, MA
Lecturer, University of Miami Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
Hour One, 9:05–9:55 a.m., Two-week course

World War I was a seminal event in world history. What were the causes of WWI? What was new about the way the war was fought? Who were the major characters? What were the most important battles? How did the war change the global map? Is WWI relevant to today’s world? Join us in an exhilarating exploration of these topics.

World War II

Richard Waller
Social studies teacher
Hour Three 11:15 a.m.–12:05 p.m., Two-week course

This year is the 75th anniversary of 1943, which was right in the middle of World War II. War raged throughout the globe, with America fully involved. High-level decisions about the direction of the war were hashed out at a number of conferences that year. Main theaters of war were the Mediterranean and Pacific Oceans and the Russian front. We will look at developments in each of these scenarios as the Allies “turn the tide” and begin to press the Axis powers back to final defeat.


Literature, Reading & Writing

Hooked on Books

Linda Conradi, MLA
Hour Four, 2:15–3:05 p.m., Two-week course

Between the covers of books, we discover worlds alien or comforting, and often places that are oddly familiar. Join a roundtable discussion that will focus on a work of fiction during Week One and nonfiction Week Two. To prepare for our first lively idea exchange, please read in advance A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L'Engle, a youthful adventure with universal and timeless life lessons. For Week Two, please read The Wright Brothers by David McCullough, an inspiring story of the part the brothers played in opening the skies to worldwide transportation. When we come together to discuss a book, we’ll share favorite passages, pose questions, give our reactions, listen to each other, and create a sense of community.

Soul Food: An Appreciation of the Written Word in Letters and Journals

Linda Conradi, MLA
Hour Two, 10:10–11:00 a.m., Two-week course

Dip into Leonardo da Vinci's notebooks, some travel journals, the diaries of Anne Frank and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, and the letters of E.B. White, John and Abigail Adams, Rainer Maria Rilke, and others. Let these published writings inform and inspire your own writing. Then pick up a pen and write from your heart.

The World Traveler

Duncan Charters, PhD
Languages professor
Hour Five, 3:20–4:10 p.m., Two-week course

How can we be kinder, more adaptable travelers when we visit different cultures? How can we open the doors to meaningful interactions without offending by our words, requests, or actions? What resources are available to us today to enrich our travel? What can we learn to say in other languages to reach out to the people we'll be visiting? We'll share our experiences so that we all learn more about how to get the most out of our travels, and we'll also find out how to learn to communicate, practicing basic greetings in a new language every day.


Music

Beatlemania: The Story of the Beatles

Marie Jureit-Beamish, PhD
Professor Emerita of Music
Hour Two, 10:10–11:00 a.m., Two-week course

More than 50 years after four British musicians calling themselves The Beatles rocked the world in 1963 with their shockingly brilliant and innovative artistry, they were named among the top 100 most influential people of the 20th century by Time magazine. Performing for a mere two years, six months, and 22 days, the collective genius of Paul McCartney, George Harrison, John Lennon, and Ringo Starr has forever since determined the direction of popular music in America and abroad. As history-making pioneers of the 60s, their charisma, freshness, youthful enthusiasm, and unique music-making continue to inspire generations of avid fans. Last year was the 50th anniversary of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, dubbed “the greatest album ever.” Reaching an audience of over 350 million viewers on Our World during its first broadcast, "All You Need Is Love" remains one of the most popular songs of all time. Let’s all celebrate Rolling Stone magazine’s proclamation that the Beatles are the “best artists of all time!”

Beginning Guitar

James Dowcett, MM
Hour Three, 11:15 a.m.–12:05 p.m., Two-week course
(rental fee associated with this class)

Would you like to play guitar while others gather around and sing? Or just play and sing on your own? We will cover how to hold, tune, and care for the guitar. You’ll learn a few simple chords, how to read and use them, some familiar songs that use those chords—and possibly a few blues patterns to spice up your playing. You might not be a guitar hero at the end of this course, but you will have a good foundation. We will also evaluate a few of the more reliable guitar websites so you can continue your development after Summer Session. This class also welcomes those who already play basic guitar and are seeking to refine their skills.

Choir

Joe Van Riper, DMA
Music professor
Hour Six, 4:25–5:15 p.m., Two-week course

Make a joyful noise unto the Lord! Come share your love of singing by participating in the Summer Session choir. This ensemble will offer a wonderful experience for community collaboration and joyous musical expression.

Listening Through the Centuries

James Dowcett, MM
Hour Five, 3:20- 4:10 p.m., Two-week course

Do we listen to Bach and Brahms the same way? Are there aspects of Mozart’s music we won’t hear in Vivaldi’s? What about Beethoven and Handel, music of the Renaissance and Middle Ages, pop music and jazz? While they all share common traits, they also differ enough to be different styles from different periods. How much of the commonality and difference are you hearing? We will climb underneath the familiar to hear those traits that make Bach, Bach and jazz, jazz.

One Hundred Years of Leonard Bernstein

Marie Jureit-Beamish, PhD
Professor Emerita of Music
Hour Four, 2:15-3:05 p.m., Two-week course

“Just call me Lenny!” and “I can't live one day without hearing music, playing it, studying it, or thinking about it.” So said Leonard Bernstein. Revered by audiences and musicians worldwide, this American superstar of music will always stand as one of the most important and influential musicians of the 20th century. Bernstein’s versatility as a performer, conductor, educator, and composer; his enthusiasm and boundless energy; his humanitarian compassion; his love for life; and his ability to communicate with people of all ages and nationalities combine to make him one of the most inspiring individuals of his time. As conductor of the New York Philharmonic, composer of West Side Story, and pianist performing Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue, Bernstein was one of the first Americans to achieve iconic recognition throughout the music world. His attitude toward music was one of unfettered and consummate love. As he put it, "Life without music is unthinkable. Music without life is academic. That is why my contact with music is a total embrace." This year celebrates the centennial of this musical genius's birth.


Politics, Economics & World Relations

After the Fall of the Wall: Cuba and Russia

John Williams, JD
Political science and Asian studies professor
Hour One, 9:05–9:55 a.m., Two-week course

The fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 changed the world, including two nations of particular interest to Americans—Cuba and Russia. These two nations have current relevance to the United States, and each has an uncertain future. Both will be the focus of upcoming Principia Lifelong Learning travel-study programs. This course provides an opportunity to catch up on current events and the forces at play behind the scenes in Cuba and Russia.

Current Affairs Discussion Group

Ed Harper, PhD
Lecturer, University of Miami Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
Dinnertime, 5:30–6:30 p.m., Monday, Wednesday, and Friday
Offered both weeks

Would you like to discuss current events within a smaller group with a knowledgeable facilitator? In this discussion group, you can learn about different perspectives and present your own views on topics in the news. Find out if you share the same excitement about national and global topics as other Summer Sessioners. Participants can prepare by brushing up on current topics in the news in order to bring not only opinions but verified facts to the table. The group will be limited to 20.

Finding Common Ground

Lee Barron, JD
Blair Lindsay, JD

Hour Three, 11:15 a.m.–12:05 p.m., One-week course
Week One only

In a time of increasing polarization in our public discourse, this class will explore ways we can reclaim civility in our conversations—public and private—and find common ground. Where conviction doesn't allow complete agreement, the ability to discuss contentious issues civilly and respectfully is critical in a democratic republic and in our individual lives.

South/Southeast Asia Mosaic

John Williams, JD
Political science and Asian studies professor
Hour Three, 11:15 a.m.- 12:05 p.m., Two-week course

South and Southeast Asia are growing in global political and economic importance. India is one of the strongest economies. China is expanding its influence by reaching across the Indian Ocean, including establishing control over the South China Sea. In this course, we’ll discuss events in Burma, Vietnam, Indonesia, the Philippines, and other South and Southeast Asian nations. Join us and gain useful background information and insight on current events in the region.

Sport, Society, and Politics: Dates that Changed Everything

Julie Blase, PhD
Political science professor
Lee Ellis, EdD
Sport studies professor
Hour Four, 2:15–3:05 p.m., Two-week course

This class explores how sport affects society and politics. A powerful agent of change that influences how people think, feel, and live their lives, sport is business, entertainment, fitness. Join us to explore how sport influences how we think about race, gender, class, character. We’ll also discuss ways that sport contributes to national pride, serves political agendas, and changes laws.


Sports & Fitness

Aquablast!

Heather Fairbanks
College Sports Information Director, Assistant Volleyball and Beach Volleyball Coach
Hour Six, 4:25–5:15 p.m., Two-week course

The water's natural buoyancy, resistance, and cooling effect make this the perfect fitness class. This shallow-water class combines the best of aquatic cardio movements with strength segments, flexibility training, and great music! We’ll begin each class with a metaphysical focus that will help support our exercise and movement.

Line Dance

Robert Baker
Head Track and Field Coach
Joy Baker
Dance instructor
Hour Five 3:20–4:10 p.m., Two-week course

No need for a partner! Robert and his wife, Joy, will start with two classic and easy-to-learn line dances, the Electric Slide and Stationary Cha Cha (cha cha can be done with or without a partner). You’ll learn at least one newer line dance each week. We may also add some basic ballroom dances such as swing, two-step, and waltz. All are welcome!

Stretch Yourself

Heather Fairbanks
College Sports Information Director, Assistant Volleyball and Beach Volleyball Coach
Early Bird, 6:30–7:20 a.m., Two-week course

This course is designed to work daily on flexibility and freedom of movement. Each class starts with a metaphysical focus on these concepts. The workout then builds on the truths we share. Classes will cover several different ways of working on increased flexibility—using ropes, dynamic stretching, yoga stretching, and more. Each day, we’ll work on balance as well, providing many opportunities to gain confidence through simple and fun physical activities.

Tennis for Life: Instruction for Beginners and Beyond

Shannon Carney, MA
USPTA Elite Professional, Head Women’s Tennis Coach
Rusty Jones
Head Men’s Tennis Coach
Hour Four, 2:15–3:05 p.m., Two-week course

Learn the game of tennis in a beginner group, or refresh your present game! We’ll cover tennis grips and strokes, shot selection and placement, strategy for singles and doubles, proper footwork, movement and balance, tennis etiquette, and how to think metaphysically about tennis. Please come with your tennis shoes (no black soles). You may bring your racquet or use one of ours.

Recreational drop-in tennis is also available each afternoon in Hexberg from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.

Trail Walking

Robert Baker
Head Track and Field Coach
Early Bird, 6:30–7:20 a.m., Two-week course

Journey with us over the many trails on the College campus. These range from hilly, wooded, single-track trails to the wide, rolling grass trail of the 2017 NCAA National Championship cross country course. Put on your walking shoes, and enjoy Principia’s wooded scenery!