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Subject Areas in 2017


Art & Art History

Adventures in Studio Art

Jerome Grimmer
Professional artist

Seeing with new inspiration is the real thrill of this class. When unseen limitless beauty that has been before our blind eyes all along is suddenly unveiled, capturing its essence and inspiration on canvas becomes surprisingly easy. Through demonstrations, exercises, and individual instruction, new students will quickly master necessary painting skills and techniques, while advanced students work on more ambitious subjects with help and guidance from the instructor as needed and requested. Finished paintings ready for framing and display are the inspiring result.

Hours Four and Five, 2:15 p.m.–4:10 p.m., Two–week course
(art supply fee associated with this class)

Along the Seine with the Impressionists and the Post-Impressionists

Susie Ledbetter
MEd

From Paris to Le Havre, the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists gathered along the Seine’s river bank with their brushes, canvases, and paint to capture everyday life and the play of light. We will examine the complex personal and artistic interactions that existed among this core group of Impressionist painters: Renoir, Monet, Manet, Morisot, Pissarro, Sisley, and Caillebotte. Although alternately competitive and collegial, they were all equally committed to portraying the life of leisure along the Seine that 19th-century Parisians enjoyed. Post-Impressionism derived from their forerunners’ breakthroughs, so we will also look at the way Seurat and Van Gogh applied their more formal and emotionally expressive styles of color and brushwork to Parisian life along the Seine.

Hour Two, 10:10–11:00 a.m., One–week course, Week One only

Art in the Reformation

Amelia Trevelyan
PhD, art history

Art has always been central to the expression of religious doctrine. Changes in content and patronage in the run-up to the Reformation reflect new approaches to Christian worship. For the Church, Counter-Reformation style and content illustrated its defense of their version of Christianity. Many well-known European artists created paintings supporting each side during those turbulent times. Dürer, Rembrandt, and Vermeer represented Protestantism, while Caravaggio, Rubens, and Bernini represented Catholicism. We’ll explore and discuss these artists and their works in the context of history.

Hour One, 9:05–9:55 a.m., One–week course, Week One only

Drawing and Sketching

Leah McFall
MSEd, art education

Keeping a sketching journal is a wonderful way to enrich your travels or just take a more reflective approach to daily living. In this class, we will work on drawing skills, including perspective, observation, shading, texture, and proportion, and we will learn from the sketching journals of some of history’s great artists. The College campus is a beautiful place to sketch—expect to return home with new ideas, enhanced skills, and a sketchbook full of great memories!

Hour Three, 11:15 a.m.–12:05 p.m., Two-week course
(art supply fee associated with this course)

Greek Art and Early Christians

Amelia Trevelyan
PhD, art history

The writings of Mary Baker Eddy and the Apostle Paul drew heavily on the classics, especially the wisdom and philosophy of ancient Greece. The ideals and methodologies of Aristotle, Plato, and Socrates provided important structures upon which to ground the revolutionary ideas of both Eddy and Paul. Similar ideas and ideals can be perceived in the art of ancient Greece. This course will look at the artworks of ancient Greece and the way they help reveal the spiritual depth of Greek idealism and its appeal to both Eddy and Paul.

Hour One, 9:05 a.m.–9:55 a.m., One–week course, Week Two only

The Rape of Europa

Susie Ledbetter
MEd

Along with other films, we’ll view the compelling documentary The Rape of Europa, which tells of the Nazis’ attempt to steal the great art of Europe. (The film is based on the Lynn Nicholas book of the same title and on Robert Edsel’s research.) Discussion will include the remarkable story of the theft, recovery, and repatriation of Europe’s cultural masterpieces, Hitler’s plan for Paris, and the allied heroes known as the “Monuments Men,” whose role in preserving cultural treasures was without precedent. 

Hour Two, 10:10–11:00 a.m., One–week course, Week Two only

The Revolutionary Era of the Arts

Clark Beim-Esche
MA, retired English/fine arts teacher

Before the late-18th century, the word revolution had the distinctly negative connotation of chaos, upheaval, and disorder. By the mid-19th century, however, almost every new development in the arts was proudly identifying itself as “revolutionary.” What happened? We’ll explore the answer to that question in this investigation of the art and music of the past two centuries. From Romanticism to Abstract Expressionism, from Beethoven’s explosive response to the orderly beauty of Haydn’s classicism to the dissonant power of Stravinsky and Charles Ives, we’ll examine the various modes of “revolution” that defined this often turbulent—and always exhilarating—period of aesthetic expression.

Hour Three, 11:15 a.m.–12:05 p.m., Two–week course

Watercolor Workshop

Leah McFall
MSEd, art education

Would you love to spend two hours every day learning and practicing watercolor techniques with a fun, supportive community of learners? If so, join us! All are welcome—from beginners to experienced artists. Through daily teacher-demos, practice, and sharing of feedback and ideas, everyone moves forward. Bring pieces you are working on, or get inspired on location. This class is tailored to meet the goals and learning needs of each student.

Hours One and Two, 9:05–11:00 a.m., Two–week course
(art supply fee associatied with this class)


Bible & Religion

Creation: 10 Texts in Context

Barry Huff
PhD candidate (ABD), ThM, MTS, religion professor

From the opening to the closing chapters of the Bible, creation plays a prominent role. Writing to communities struggling with exile, persecution, and devastation, several biblical authors employed the theme of creation to transform thought, convey radical messages of healing and hope, and reveal God’s deep love for all flora, fauna, and ecosystems.  
This course features 10 biblical creation texts in their historical, cultural, and literary contexts and explores their contemporary relevance. Through lectures and discussion, you’ll gain deeper insights into creation texts and themes in Genesis, Exodus, Job, Psalms, Isaiah, John, and Revelation.

Hour Five, 3:20–4:10 p.m., One-week course, Week One only

History of Christianity

Gretchen Starr-LeBeau
PhD, religion professor

Explore the history of Christianity from the time of Jesus and the disciples to the present. We’ll discuss key texts and figures—from early Christian thinkers and writers through the Protestant reformers to important figures in the Christian world today. The course will also incorporate discussion of the history of Christianity through art, music, and architecture. Week One will cover the period up to the Reformation; Week Two will move from the Reformation to the present.

Hour Three, 11:15 a.m.–12:05 p.m., Two-week course

Jews, Christians, and Muslims

Gretchen Starr-LeBeau
PhD, religion professor

This course introduces students to the shared heritage and legacy of conflict and coexistence of the three great monotheistic religions—the so-called “children of Abraham.” The first week will introduce each religion and compare their approaches to key practices and beliefs. In the second week, we’ll discuss a variety of case studies of interaction between these religious communities in the past and present.

Hour Four, 2:15–3:05 p.m., Two-week course

Job, Psalms, and Proverbs

Barry Huff
PhD candidate (ABD), ThM, MTS, religion professor

Explore the Bible's literary masterpiece, hymnal, and wisdom through interactive lectures interspersed with short discussions. Wrestle with vital questions and theological breakthroughs in Job, the subject of Barry's dissertation and master's thesis. Witness the book of Job’s transformation of the concepts of God, grace, and working through challenges. Probe the spiritual significance of the genres, editing, and imagery of Psalms. Discover how the Psalter's structure highlights the reign of God and moves us through lament to praise. Revel in the wisdom of Proverbs.

Hour Five, 3:20–4:10 p.m., One-week course, Week Two only

Matthew's Gospel: The How-To Manual for Building Faith Communities Then and Now

Madelon Maupin
MTS, founder of Bible Roads

Have you ever wondered why Matthew’s Gospel leads the canon in telling the story of Christ Jesus, even though it wasn’t the first gospel written? Early Christians found its clear teachings and organized structure compelling as they learned what it meant to be Christian, how to pray, how to treat one another, who should be included in their growing church community, and so on. As a result, it became a treasured favorite. We’ll look at a number of texts, including the Matthew Code and scriptural texts leading up to it that lend fresh insight into its present application. In just five class sessions, you’ll gain a working understanding of this gospel’s uniqueness from the others, as well as new ways you can apply its loved teachings in your life.

Hour Four, 2:15–3:05 p.m., One-week course, Week Two only

Old Testament Highlights

Barry Huff
PhD candidate (ABD), ThM, MTS, religion professor

Discover new insights into the healing messages of the Hebrew Bible by learning about its texts and contexts. This class shares highlights from the 28 Old Testament courses Barry has taught at Principia College. Explore when specific books were written and why that matters. Trace the development of authors’ concepts of God—from national warrior to universal mother. Hear the prophets’ calls for justice. Stand in awe as God creates, liberates, guides, supplies, comforts, restores, reveals, and heals. Feel the infinite embrace of God’s steadfast love!

Hour One, 9:05–9:55 a.m., Two-week course

The Patriarchs

Evan MacDonald
Bible studies teacher

As members of the Children of Israel, we have a spiritual connection to the patriarchs of yore. Let's explore together how God's provision for them gives relevance to His covenant in the 21st century. 

Hour Two, 10:10–11:00 a.m., One-week course, Week One only

Symbols of Christ

Evan MacDonald
Bible studies teacher

The Gospel of John takes a decidedly different look at the life of Jesus of Nazareth. Let's take a week to dig deep into the Bible to see how Jesus' statements, "I am the light of the world," "I am the good shepherd," "I am the true vine," "I am the door," and "I am the bread of life" show us how the Christ was ever-present throughout Scripture and into today.

Hour Four, 2:15–3:05 p.m., One-week course, Week One only

Teaching the Bible to Children of All Ages

Kathryn L. Merrill
MA, School Bible Program Coordinator

Explore the fundamental components of the "Manual Directives" for Sunday School in the Manual of The Mother Church by Mary Baker Eddy. We’ll cover the Sermon on the Mount (including the Beatitudes and the Lord's Prayer), the Ten Commandments, and ways to approach our weekly Bible Lessons. We’ll also discuss how to share healings with children.

Hour Two, 10:10–11:00 a.m., One-week course, Week Two only

Teaching the Bible to Our Youngest Students

Dorothy Halverson
MA, Principia's Acorn Director

Come share ideas on how to help young children learn about the Bible. We will look at some of the first Bible lessons and stories often shared with young children and provide concrete examples and materials for related activities that we’ll create during class. The activities are geared toward two- to six-year-olds. If you're a Sunday School teacher, parent, or grandparent who interacts with young children, you won't want to miss this course.

Hour Three, 11:15 a.m.–12:05 p.m., One-week course, Week One only


Computer Training

Communicating across Generations: Social Media Today

Jon Hosmer
MALD, Principia's Web Director

Technology keeps transforming how we communicate with family, friends, communities, and the world. For example, many families turn to Facebook or Instagram. But what about Twitter, YouTube, and all those hashtags we see everywhere from TV to billboards to t-shirts? And what is Snapchat? We will look at these ways to communicate, paying particular attention to building bridges across generations, since different generations tend to favor different social media platforms. Boomers, Gen-Xers, Millennials, and Gen-Zers all view technology, sharing, and privacy through different lenses. Rather than judging other generations, we’ll be finding ways to reach out and connect with others in a manner that feels safe and comfortable. This course is taught in a computer lab, but you may use your own device if you wish.

Hour Four, 2:15–3:05 p.m., One-week course, offered both weeks

Destination: The Cloud

Jon Hosmer
MALD, Principia's Web Director

Whether you are a digital native or digital immigrant, you’re surrounded by cloud computing. We’re all using it, at least a little. So, what is it? Is it a good thing? How safe is it? We will look at mainstream cloud computing options from Google, Apple, and Microsoft, including e-mail, photos, videos, documents, calendars, storage, and more. We will also delve into sharing and collaboration in the cloud. Together, we will see what these things do and how they can work for us on our phones, computers, and other devices. We will look at how we are already using the cloud, and we’ll work toward making more informed decisions about what we put into the cloud and what good we can expect to get from it. This course is taught in a computer lab, but you may use your own device if you wish.

Hour Five, 3:20–4:10 p.m., One-week course, offered both weeks


History

Chicago: My Kind of Town

Howard Bay
MA, retired history teacher

Chicago goes by many names—Windy City, Second City, and City of Broad Shoulders, to name a few. Easily recognized for its iconic skyline, museums, Chicago-style pizza, and the Blues Brothers, it’s been called the quintessential American city. However, it’s story is not so well known. How did Chicago grow from a remote swamp into a city of epic proportions in the space of just 60 years? What extraordinary series of events allowed it to become home to the largest grain port, meatpacking plant, and lumberyard in the world? How did its captains of industry reinvent the way America did business? And beginning with Lincoln’s presidential campaign in 1860, why has Chicago played host to over two dozen nominating conventions—more than two and a half times that of any other city? We will answer these questions and more as we discover what Frank Sinatra meant when he crooned that Chicago is “one town that won’t let you down.”

Hour Five, 3:20–4:10 p.m., Two-week course

The Generals

John Glen
PhD, history

Absent the leadership of U.S. Generals George Marshall, Dwight David “Ike” Eisenhower, George Patton, and Douglas MacArthur, the Axis powers may have been successful in their efforts at world domination and ethnic genocide. This course will examine these four generals’ parallel and intersecting lives and careers—and how they prevented the world from descending into perdition. We will develop a better understanding of what motivated them and of their status as iconic American military leaders.

Hour One, 9:05 a.m.–9:55 a.m., Two-week course

John Ford's Stagecoach: Appreciating a Film Classic

Clark Beim-Esche
MA, retired English/fine arts teacher

By 1939, the year in which John Ford directed Stagecoach, many filmmakers in Hollywood already regarded the Western as a genre that had run its course. And one of the film’s stars, a handsome, young man named John Wayne, had already appeared in so many low-budget “horse operas” that the arc of his career was assumed to be irreversibly downward. That Stagecoach proved them wrong on both counts is now a universally acknowledged fact of film history. But why and how was this movie so successful in revitalizing the genre, and how did it catapult John Wayne into newfound stardom? These and many other questions will be at the heart of our discussions as we take a closer look at this indispensable film. Along with analyzing several of its key performances, we will focus on the screenplay of Dudley Nichols, inspired costume design of Walter Plunkett, memorable cinematography of Burt Glennon, sound design of Frank Mahen, and musical direction of Boris Morros. As we do so, we will develop a deeper appreciation of John Ford’s monumental achievement as a director.

Hour One, 9:05–9:55 a.m., Two-week course

Made You Laugh: Comedy's Golden Years

Howard Bay
MA, retired history teacher

Many vaudeville acts successfully made the transition from the stage to movies to radio and finally to television. Tuning in each week to lovable characters on shows such as radio’s Fibber McGee and Molly or television’s I Love Lucy and The Honeymooners, we cracked up at their zany antics and laughed again and again at the reruns. Let’s relive some of our favorite comedians’ funniest routines from yesteryear—and then go behind the scenes to hear the backstory of how they made us laugh.

Hour Two, 10:10–11:00 a.m., Two-week course

Rogues, Ruffians, and Rapscallions

John Glen
PhD, history

Through Socratic lecture and interaction, we will examine the careers of eight iconic individuals in American history, some well-known, some not so well-known—Daniel Sickles, Bedford Forrest, George Custer, Wyatt Earp, Butch Cassidy, Tom Horn, Lucien Conein, and John Paul Vann. We’ll discover whether they showed moral character and, if so, why. And if not, why not. 

Hour Four, 2:15–3:05 p.m., Two-week course


Literature, Reading, & Writing

Hooked on Books

Linda Conradi
MLA

Between the covers of books, we discover worlds alien or comforting, and often places that are oddly familiar. Join a roundtable book discussion that will focus on a work of fiction during Week One and of nonfiction Week Two. To prepare for our lively idea exchange, please read in advance The Nightingale, a World War II story by Kristin Hannah and Elephant Company: The Inspiring Story of an Unlikely Hero and the Animals Who Helped Him Save Lives in World War II by Vicki Croke. When we come together to discuss a book, we’ll share favorite passages, pose questions, give our reactions, listen to each other, and create a sense of community.

Hour Five, 3:20 p.m.–4:10 p.m., Two-week course

Live It, Love It, Write It!

Linda Conradi
MLA

Creative nonfiction includes articles, essays, memoir, and more. In this class we will practice writing each of these and read brief published excerpts. Explore the landscape of your mind. Listen to the inner voice, and then write the ideas that come to you. Revel in the surprise of what you are inspired to write. At the end of this class, you will have a collection of your workshop writing to refine, revise, savor, and share.

Hour One, 9:05–9:55 a.m., Two-week course


Music

The 20 Greatest Symphonies of All Time

Marie Jureit-Beamish
PhD, Professor Emerita of Music

The mighty symphony has been "the bedrock of western orchestral music" since its inception in the 19th century. Among the thousands of symphonies written, which are the greatest, as voted by over 150 of the world's leading conductors in BBC Magazine? From Mozart's Jupiter to Beethoven's Eroica, from Beethoven's Ode to Joy to Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique, from Tchaikovsky's Pathétique to Brahms’s Symphony No. 1—all 20 will come to life in their full grandeur during this total immersion into some of the best, most-loved music ever composed. As a lifelong orchestral musician, Dr. Jureit-Beamish brings her unique perspective to all of the music you’ll experience.

Hour Three, 11:15 a.m.–12:05 p.m., Two-week course

Choir

Joe Van Riper
PhD, music professor

Make a joyful noise unto the Lord! Come share your love of singing by participating in the Summer Session choir. This ensemble will offer a wonderful experience for community collaboration and joyous musical expression.

Hour Six, 4:25–5:15 p.m., Two-week course

The Hills Are Alive with Music!

Marie Jureit-Beamish
PhD, Professor Emerita of Music

The Sound of Music movie sets the stage for this course filled with great music. A heartwarming story by Rodgers and Hammerstein, the 1965 film is based on the real-life story of the Trapp Family Singers of pre-World War II Austria. Julie Andrews, as Maria, brings a new love of life and music into the home—and into our classroom. Ever since studying in Salzburg's Mozarteum in 1970, Dr. Jureit-Beamish has lived a life of music inspired by the Alps and the celebrated festivals of Salzburg, Verbier, and Lucerne. After hearing highlights of the festivals, you, too, will be singing, “The hills are alive with the sound of music.”

Hour Four, 2:15–3:05 p.m., Two-week course


Politics, Economics, & World Relations

Africa: Current Events

John W. Williams
JD, political science professor

Africa deserves our attention! This vast continent, which is a focus of Chinese economic expansion, includes potential for expansive economic growth, challenges of terrorism, and new opportunities for democratic change. This course offers a foundational understanding of the region and its current events. We’ll consider the continent’s diversity, geography, and history. And we’ll try to identify key participants in the region and their myriad, complex relationships. Before we commit to solutions, we need to appreciate the dynamics of this wonderful, underappreciated area.

Hour Two 10:10–11:00 a.m., Two-week course

Current Affairs Discussion Group

Ed Harper
PhD, lecturer, University of Miami Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

Would you like to discuss current events in a small group with a knowledgeable facilitator? In this discussion group, you can learn about different perspectives and present your own views on national and global topics. Participants can prepare by brushing up on current topics in the news in order to bring not only opinions but verified facts to the table. The group will be limited to 20 students.

Dinnertime 5:30–6:30 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday both weeks

Election 2016: How Did We Get Here?

Brian D. Roberts
PhD, political science professor 
John W. Williams
JD, political science professor

How did the 2016 presidential election happen? We'll examine the underlying currents of thought and society, and we'll look at the electoral structure that enabled the process to occur. We’ll also consider what this election means for the future of our political system and democracy. With the new president in office for less than six months at the time we meet, we'll examine the pathways forward. What does Donald Trump’s election and presidency mean for bringing the nation together and making government and the political system more responsive to the people?

Hour Three, 11:15–12:05 p.m., Two-week course

The Future of the European Union: Life after the Brexit Vote

Brian D. Roberts
PhD, political science professor

This course will explore the future of the European Union (EU), particularly in light of last summer’s referendum in the United Kingdom when voters in this EU member state voted to leave the Union. The first week of this course will familiarize students with the origins, development, and current structure of the EU, including its major institutions. The second week will explore the future of the EU as a supranational institution.

Hour Four, 2:15–3:05 p.m., Two-week course

The Idea of America: How Values Shaped Our Republic and Hold the Key to Our Future

Ed Harper
PhD, lecturer, University of Miami Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
Lucy Harper
MA, lecturer, University of Miami Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

The Idea of America is a discussion seminar designed by scholars associated with Colonial Williamsburg. The seminar explores whether the American people can sustain the nation as the world's superpower—founded as a small republic in a small, remote land about 240 years ago—despite the inherent tensions between/among the values on which the republic is based. Debates about equality versus freedom, private wealth versus common wealth, law versus ethics, and unity versus diversity have framed America’s discussions from earliest times until today.

Course Book: The Idea of America: Our Values, Our Legacy, Our Future by John O. Wilson. The cost of the book is $9.95 plus shipping. You will be given several options for shipping the book. Please call the Principia Lifelong Learning Office at 618.374.5211 or e-mail PLL@principia.edu for ordering information.

Hour Five, 3:20–4:10 p.m., Two-week course
(book supply fee associated with this course)


Sports & Fitness

Aquablast

Mary Ann Sprague
MBA, College Head Volleyball Coach, Associate Athletic Director

The water's natural buoyancy, resistance, and cooling effect make this the perfect fitness class. This shallow-water class combines the best of aquatic cardio movements with strength segments, flexibility training, and great music! We’ll begin each class with a metaphysical focus that will help support our exercise and movement.

Hour Six, 4:25–5:15 p.m., Two-week course

Stretch Yourself

Mary Ann Sprague
MBA, College Head Volleyball Coach, Associate Athletic Director

Designed to work daily on flexibility and freedom of movement, each class session will start with a metaphysical focus related to these concepts, and the workout will build on that truth. Classes will teach several different ways of working on increased flexibility—using ropes, dynamic stretching, and more. We’ll work on balance each day as well, giving students many opportunities to grow more confident in their balance through simple, fun physical activities.

Early Bird, 6:30–7:20 a.m., Two-week course

Tennis for Life: Instruction for Beginners and Beyond

Shannon Carney
MAEd, USPTA Elite Professional, College Head Women's Tennis Coach
Rusty Jones
College Head Men's Tennis Coach

Learn the game of tennis in a beginner group, or refresh your present game! We’ll cover tennis grips and strokes, shot selection and placement, strategy for singles and doubles, proper footwork, movement and balance, tennis etiquette, and how to think metaphysically about tennis. Please come with your tennis shoes (no black soles). You may bring your racquet or use ours.

Recreational Tennis is also available each afternoon in Hexberg from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.

Early Bird, 6:30–7:20 a.m., Two-week course

Trail Walking

Chuck Wilcoxen
Former College Head Cross Country and Track and Field Coach

Journey with us over many of the trails on the College campus. These range from hilly, wooded, single-track trails to the wide, rolling, grass trails of Principia’s National Championship cross country course. Put on your walking shoes, and enjoy our wooded scenery!

Early Bird, 6:30–7:20 a.m., Two-week course